This report sets out how the gender pay gap, the difference between women’s and men’s earnings, has changed in the public sector since 2010 until 2016.

  1. It is based on figures for 31 European countries published by Eurostat, the European Union’s statistical agency, in February 2018. The figures show the unadjusted gender pay gap, that is the difference between the average gross hourly earnings of men and women expressed as a percentage of the average gross hourly earnings of men.
  2. As it is unadjusted, it takes no account of differences in qualifications, experience or other factors.

This report reveals in detail the extent of discrimination women face in being paid equal to men for performing the same work around the globe. The report also sets a real challenge for governments and employers to respond to union calls for a renewed effort to tackle the gender pay gap.

Despite decades of anti-discrimination legislation and changes in company rhetoric, women, whether they are in New York or Shanghai, find their pay cheque contains on average sixteen per cent less than male co-workers. That is the official figure, derived from applying a standard method across sixty-three countries. However trade unions in a number of countries report the real gap to be even higher. Hundreds of millions of women working in informal and unprotected work do not appear in any records, and many developing countries do not have the means, or in some cases the will, to keep national records on the world of work. This is a huge deficit in the global knowledge base, and one for which the international community as a whole must take responsibility.

Discover here the ITUC Report concerning gender pay gap from 2010 until 2016.